News & Media

GENERAL CONTACT INFO

Children’s Law Center
501 3rd Street, NW 8th Floor
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 467-4900
(202) 467-4949 fax

MEDIA CONTACT

Allyson Boucher
(202) 467-4900 x515
aboucher@childrenslawcenter.org

 

Congratulating 2019’s Champions for Children Winners

March 26, 2020
Over the last year, partners, associates, staff, clients and vendors dedicated themselves to fundraising to serve DC’s children. Now, we’re ready to reveal the 2019 Champions for Children winners. Please join us in celebrating Latham & Watkins LLP, Mayer Brown LLP, Miller & Chevalier Chartered and Bates White Economic Consulting as our 2019 Champions for Children Award winners.

Children's Law Center Stands Committed to DC's Children and Families

March 17, 2020
Click here for our list of available resources to support children and families during COVID-19.  

DC Line: Advocates to mayor: Make investments that put DC’s children first

February 19, 2020
At Children's Law Center, we strongly believe that it's time to build a DC budget that puts children first. That's why we, in partnership with six other advocate organizations, wrote an Op-Ed for The DC Line urging District leaders to make three critical investments that will ensure ALL DC children learn: 1) Boost per pupil funding to support the students who need it most;2) Expand school-based mental health across more schools; and3) Prioritize DC's youngest children with high-quality, affordable childcare.

WUSA9: 'They deserve to have a healthy home' | Poor housing conditions making kids sick in DC

February 19, 2020
Through our medical-legal partnerships with clinics like those belonging to Children's National Hospital, we know that children from Wards 7 and 8 have 20 times the ER visits for asthma compared to children living in NW DC.

The Washington Post: Following a disease diagnosis and tough senior year, she thought she had graduated from high school. She hadn’t.

February 15, 2020
Sometimes the children we work with face a serious health condition that keeps them out of school for a prolonged period. They might be hospitalized or confined to home for more than 10 straight days, or they may have a chronic condition, like sickle cell anemia, that causes repeated, intermittent absences. More than 150 DC students find themselves in these situations every year and request home or hospital instruction.

Washington City Paper: Success Is a Matter of Perspective for D.C.'s Temporary Rental Subsidy Program

January 30, 2020
At Children's Law Center, we often come into contact with the Rapid Rehousing system through our housing conditions work. Many of the worst housing conditions cases we are referred are clients in rapid rehousing -- some who have been living in their units as little as a month before issues like rampant mold that triggers serious asthma exacerbations, water intrusions, or horrible mice infestations become apparent.

WUSA9: DC Council wants to split DCRA into 2 separate departments

December 11, 2019
CLC Senior Supervising Attorney Kathy Zeisel testified before the D.C. Council yesterday on the Department of Buildings Establishment Act of 2019. "We believe the Council has the answers it needs and should break up DCRA," Kathy Zeisel with the Children's Law Center said. Read the full article here.  

NBC4: DC Hires Resident Inspectors After Boy Killed in Illegal House Fire

December 11, 2019
CLC Senior Supervising Attorney Kathy Zeisel spoke with Mark Segraves of NBC4 about the need for more, professional housing inspectors -- not DCRA-contracted "Uber" inspectors -- to ensure the safety and health of DC tenants. Watch the video interview here.

DCist: That Whole ‘Uber, But For Housing Inspectors’ Program Is Up And Running

December 10, 2019
DCRA has hired hundreds of new "inspectors" in recent months, but they're not full-tme employees -- they're contracted workers that the agency's head has described as Uber for property inspectors. CLC Senior Attorney Kathy Zeisel spoke with Martin Austermuhle of WAMU about the need for more, professional housing inspectors in the District and how the creation of a separate agency, the Department of Buildings, could better protect and serve tenants.